Meek Mill’s legal team are trying to get him out of prison as soon as possible. On Tuesday (Nov. 28), attorneys filed an emergency motion to have the embattled rapper freed on bail, reports Philly.com.

The documents, which were filed with the state Superior Court, are requesting that the Dreamchaser leader be released immediately. Mill’s attorneys contend that Philadelphia Judge Genece E. Brinkley, who originally sentenced Mill to 2-4 years in prison, has not responded to any of their post-sentencing appeals.

“As of this filing, more than 10 days after submission [Brinkley] has taken no action — not even to schedule a hearing — on any petitioner’s motions, and in particular not on the bail motion,” states the emergency habeas corpus petition.

According to Philly.com, habeas corpus motions are typically a last resort after a criminal defendant has exhausted other avenues of appeal. And legally, Brinkley has 30 days to respond to Mill’s Nov. 14 motions.

Attorneys say that Mill is caught in a "catch-22," meaning, he can’t appeal his conviction and sentence to the Superior Court until Brinkley addresses his post-sentencing motions and she "refuses to do so."

Brinkley is prohibited from speaking on the matter, including accusations by Mill's attorney, Joe Tacopina, of alleged judicial misconduct on her part.

On Monday (Nov. 27), the Rev. Al Sharpton visited Mill at the Chester State Correctional Institution in Pennsylvania where he is imprisoned for violating his probation. Sharpton told the media that Mill's sentencing was unjust and a byproduct of a systemic problem in the criminal justice system.

“He’s representative of many people in institutions like this, that do little or nothing,” Sharpton told reporters after meeting with Mill. “They are violated and their lives and businesses are ruined. If you can do this to a successful artist like Meek Mill, you can do this to many around the country.”

“He seemed very strong, he seemed very determined. He does not seem bitter,” added Sharpton, when reporters asked about Mill's well-being. “He’s worried about his son. He wanted to make sure his son and mother are all right.”